Do you know?

Do you know? (Submitted by Sean Ness)

February 9, 2016 (Numbers in brackets indicate the difficulty level of the questions; For more examples of questions with difficulty levels, refer to Fact File section, starting January, 2016) Topic - WORLD Questions: (5) Chemnitz is the third largest city in Saxony in Germany - it lies near the border with what country? (5) Nanyang is a prefecture level city with a population of about 1.5 million people. Nanyang borders Xinyang Province to the southeast but lies in the southwest of what province? (5) What coastal city lying on a fjord of the same name is one of the major Norwegian cities and lies parallel with the Swedish city of Östersund? (4) What is the main ethnic group of China, consisting of approximately 91.6% of the population? (4) First assuming office in 1994 “Alexander Lukashenko” is the current President of what country - the country’s name literally translates to ‘Whte Russia’? (3) “Xi Jinping”, the current President of China was born and grew up in what city containing the Temple of Heaven and the Forbidden City? (5) What large oblast north of the republics of Tuva and Buryatia contains Lake Baikal? (4) What Oblast is a large island off the coast of the Khabarovsk Krai and is north of Japan? (5) Jade Bight is on the northern coast of Germany and forms a part of what sea? (4) Stanley is the capital of what overseas territory of the United Kingdom? (4) The Kidal Temple lies southeast of the city of Malang in what country consisting of many islands? (5) Gunsan (Kunsan) is a city in what province in southern South Korea? (3) What is the name of the main current lying in the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea? (4) What current lies in between Madagascar and Mainland Africa in the Indian Ocean? (5) What is the southernmost and least populated municipality in Greenland? (5) The city of Funchal lies in what Portuguese archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean? (4) What city is the capital of the archipelagic country of Cape Verde? (3) The city of Medina lies on the edge of the Hejaz in what Middle Eastern country? (3) What sea that is important to shipping and trade does the Hejaz border? (4) Mt. Kulal lies in the Chalbi Desert in the northern part of what African country? (5) Yei is a city in the southern part of the state of Central Equatoria, this state also contains the national capital in what country? (4) The South African city of Port Elizabeth lies on the Indian Ocean in what South African province? (4) The Amirante Islands is a group of coral islands belonging to the outer islands of what country in the Indian Ocean? (5) Lying on the Atlantic Ocean in Brazil, the Brazilian city of Fortaleza is the capital of what state? (4) The Makran Coast Range and the Central Makran Range lie mostly in what country? (5) Otsu is the capital city of what Japanese Prefecture? (5) What mountain range that straddles the West African Coast stretches from Gabon to northern Angola? (4) What is the former name of the coast that is parallel to the Bight of Benin? (4) The largest lake in Africa “Lake Victoria” borders what 3 African countries? (3) Which Alpine country is divided into 26 Cantons? Questions with answers: (5) Chemnitz is the third largest city in Saxony in Germany - it lies near the border with what country? (Czech Republic) (5) Nanyang is a prefecture level city with a population of about 1.5 million people. Nanyang borders Xinyang Province to the southeast but lies in the southwest of what province? (Henan) (5) What coastal city lying on a fjord of the same name is one of the major Norwegian cities and lies parallel with the Swedish city of Östersund? (Trondheim) (4) What is the main ethnic group of China, consisting of approximately 91.6% of the population? (Han Chinese) (4) First assuming office in 1994 “Alexander Lukashenko” is the current President of what country - the country’s name literally translates to ‘Whte Russia’? (Belarus) (3) “Xi Jinping”, the current President of China was born and grew up in what city containing the Temple of Heaven and the Forbidden City? (Beijing) (5) What large oblast north of the republics of Tuva and Buryatia contains Lake Baikal? (Irkutsk) (4) What Oblast is a large island off the coast of the Khabarovsk Krai and is north of Japan? (Sakhalin) (5) Jade Bight is on the northern coast of Germany and forms a part of what sea? (North Sea) (4) Stanley is the capital of what overseas territory of the United Kingdom? (Falkland Islands) (4) The Kidal Temple lies southeast of the city of Malang in what country consisting of many islands? (Indonesia) (5) Gunsan (Kunsan) is a city in what province in southern South Korea? (North Jeolla Province) (3) What is the name of the main current lying in the Coral Sea and the Tasman Sea? (East Australian Current) (4) What current lies in between Madagascar and Mainland Africa in the Indian Ocean? (Agulhas Current) (5) What is the southernmost and least populated municipality in Greenland? (Kujalleq) (5) The city of Funchal lies in what Portuguese archipelago in the Atlantic Ocean? (Madeira Islands) (4) What city is the capital of the archipelagic country of Cape Verde? (Praia) (3) The city of Medina lies on the edge of the Hejaz in what Middle Eastern country? (Saudi Arabia) (3) What sea that is important to shipping and trade does the Hejaz border? (Red Sea) (4) Mt. Kulal lies in the Chalbi Desert in the northern part of what African country? (Kenya) (5) Yei is a city in the southern part of the state of Central Equatoria, this state also contains the national capital in what country? (South Sudan) (4) The South African city of Port Elizabeth lies on the Indian Ocean in what South African province? (Eastern Cape Province) (4) The Amirante Islands is a group of coral islands belonging to the outer islands of what country in the Indian Ocean? (Seychelles) (5) Lying on the Atlantic Ocean in Brazil, the Brazilian city of Fortaleza is the capital of what state? (Ceará) (4) The Makran Coast Range and the Central Makran Range lie mostly in what country? (Pakistan) (5) Otsu is the capital city of what Japanese Prefecture? (Shiga) (5) What mountain range that straddles the West African Coast stretches from Gabon to northern Angola? (Crystal Mountains) (4) What is the former name of the coast that is parallel to the Bight of Benin? (Slave Coast) (4) The largest lake in Africa “Lake Victoria” borders what 3 African countries? (Kenya, Uganda, Tanzania) (KUT) (3) Which Alpine country is divided into 26 Cantons? (Switzerland)

Why Geography Bee?

Why Geography Bee?

Preparing for this competition is a fun way of learning about places and people, all across the world! It increases geographic knowledge and helps children in becoming champions. It instills in them the universal principles of education – the desire to learn, the ability to focus, the discipline to stay on course, the importance of working hard, an opportunity to understand novel concepts and to make a sense of every day, world events .
Preparing for Geography Bee leads to learning important life lessons that are absolute pre-requisites for higher achievement.

Why Geography?

Why Geography?

In an increasingly interconnected, interdependent and compressed world, knowing about the world and the happenings around will enable us to understand how remote events have the ability to impact people's lives all around the world. Geography connects physical systems, cultural characteristics, evolution and modification of environments and availability and distribution of resources. Being Geographically literate and by having a mental map of the world, children will have a decent chance to become global citizens and consequently, primed to be active players on the world stage. They are also more likely to appreciate Mother Earth as the homeland of humankind, for making wise management decisions about how the planet's resources should be conserved and used in the next century.

Sunday, January 31, 2016

GeoBee Fact File - February, 2016

Read the posted information to expand your body of knowledge and make a note of facts that are not familiar to you. This is also the location for you to post information that you learn from other resources in the ongoing Fact File assignment (seniors, at least 10 NEW facts that your learned, 3 times a week; juniors, at least 10 NEW facts, twice a week). Avoid repetition of information that already exists on my blog...
Ensure that all posts are accurate, appropriately worded and relevant!!!
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(From CNN)

Map - Tracking Zika Virus


 http://www.cnn.com/specials/health/zika

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(From NASA)
Map - Global Lightning


Both terrifying and thrilling, lightning is one of the most obvious signs of the immense energy involved in severe storms. Detecting lightning strikes is important for improving public safety during severe weather, warning land managers of possible wildfire triggers, and protecting electrical and transportation systems. Earth scientists are interested in detecting lightning because it helps pinpoint where and when strong convection—the rising of air— is occurring. Convection is one of the Earth system’s key mechanisms for “evening out” heat and moisture across the globe, and yearly maps of lightning flashes may help scientists identify how parts of the Earth's climate system, such as severe storms and precipitation, might be changing over time.

The map above shows the average yearly counts of lightning flashes per square kilometer based on data collected by NASA satellites between 1995 and 2002. Places where less than 1 flash occurred (on average) each year are gray or light purple. The places with the largest number of lightning strikes are deep red. Much more lightning occurs over land than ocean because daily sunshine heats up the land surface faster than the ocean. The heated surface heats the air, and more hot air leads to stronger convection, thunderstorms, and lightning. The map also shows that more lightning occurs near the equator than near the poles. This pattern is also due to differences in heating. The equator is warmer than the poles, and convection, thunderstorms, and lightning are widespread across the tropics every day.

Some facts about Lightning

  • On average, about 200 people are killed by lightning in the United States every year.
  • The state of Florida holds the title of the “Deadliest State.” There are twice as many lightning casualties as in any other state. 10% of all people struck by lightning were in Florida at the time.
  • The chance to be killed by lightning is 1 in 2,000.000. You have the same chance dying from falling out of bed.
  • Never talk on the phone while a storm is breaking outside. Not only do cell phones “attract” lightning, but about 1% of all lightning deaths in the U.S. are a result of people talking inside the home on a corded phone during a thunderstorm.
  • About 71% of all people struck by lightning survive. The fatal cases are usually the result of cardiac arrest. However, those who survive often suffer from serious health and psychological problems like loss of memory or sensitivity, insomnia, impaired hearing, or constant pain.

GeoBee News of the Day - February, 2016

As you follow important events around the world, make a note of them from the competition perspective and post the facts here in a statement or in a Q&A format.
Emphasize the geographical aspects of the place more than the main news/event itself.
Make sure that the posts are accurate, complete and are properly worded. Look at the posts in this section (going back a few months) to get a correct perspective and format...
Also, click on the posted  links and follow the news all around the world!
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(From BBC)

Bolivia's colourful Oruro carnival



People in the Bolivian city of Oruro are gearing up for carnival.
This year's celebrations start on 30 January, but the main days will be on 5, 6 and 7 of February when thousands of people will congregate in Oruro. The carnival dates back more than two centuries and is one of Latin America's most colourful.

They play marches, cuecas (a musical style popular in Bolivia, Chile and Argentina) and other typical rhythms while they parade along a 3km (1.9-mile) route on the first day of the Oruro carnival. Key to the Oruro carnival are "fraternidades", fraternal orders or fellowships, which parade around town preceded by a richly decorated float carrying a religious statue.

The elaborate costumes, masks and decorations used in the Oruro carnival are largely made by hand in small workshops such as Berna Bordados y Artesanal. There are also dances representing Bolivia's colonial history.  One of the most traditional is the "Morenada", performed by dancers representing African slaves brought to Bolivia during Spanish colonial times to work in the mines.  Their masks have outstretched tongues to represent the exhaustion from which the slaves suffered after long hours down Bolivia's silver mines. There are also dances representing Bolivia's colonial history.  Another particularly athletic and colourful dance is the Tinku, a form of ritualistic combat

Click on the link   http://www.bbc.com/news/world-latin-america-35400563    for more pictures and information.  Make a note of places and interesting facts!

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Saturday, January 2, 2016

GeoBee Fact File - January, 2016

Read the posted information to expand your body of knowledge and make a note of facts that are not familiar to you.  Post all the NEW facts (as you learn them) in this section in a statement or in a Q/A format.  This is also the location for you to post information in the ongoing Fact File assignment (seniors, at least 10 NEW facts that your learned, 3 times a week; juniors, at least 10 NEW facts, twice a week).
Ensure that all posts are accurate, clear and relevant!!!
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(From BBC)
Bhutan's dark secret to happiness
http://www.bbc.com/travel/story/20150408-bhutans-dark-secret-to-happiness



A devotee before the Buddha Dordenma statue in Thimphu. (Credit: Prakesh Mathema/AFP/Getty)

Ten interesting facts about Bhutan (from WWF)
Until recently, the tiny Asian kingdom of Bhutan remained tucked away in total isolation from the rest of the world. That segregation helped to preserve its deep Buddhist traditions, importance of the family and pristine landscapes. It’s also made it a fascinating country to study.

10. One of 43 landlocked countries in the world, Bhutan is about half the size of the state of Indiana.
9. The word “Bhutan” translates to “Land of the Thunder Dragon.” It earned the nickname because of the fierce storms that often roll in from the Himalayas.
8. Bhutan is the first country in the world with specific constitutional obligations on its people to protect the environment. Among its requirements: At least 60 percent of the nation must remain under forest cover at all times.
7. One-third of Bhutan’s population is under the age of 14; its median age is 22.3 years.
6. Thimpu is one of just two capital cities in Asia that does not have a single traffic light. (The other is Pyongyang, North Korea.) There was such public outcry when local officials installed a single signal that it was quickly removed, and a traffic officer was re-assigned to the intersection.
5. Bhutan is the only nation in the world where the sale of tobacco is banned.
4. At 24,840 feet, Gangkhar Puensum is the highest point in Bhutan—and the highest unclimbed mountain in the world.
3. Bhutanese manners dictate that you are to refuse food whenever it’s offered to you. The tradition is to say the words “meshu meshu” and cover your mouth with your hands. You can give in, though, after two or three offers.
2. Anyone found guilty of killing a highly endangered and culturally sacred black-necked crane could be sentenced to life in prison.
1. Bhutan is one of the last countries in the world to introduce television to its people. The government lifted a ban on TV—and on the Internet—only 11 years ago.


GeoBee News of the Day - January, 2016

Happy New Year!

As you follow important events around the world, make a note of them from the competition perspective and post the facts here in a statement or in a Q&A format.
Emphasize the geographical aspects of the place more than the main news/event itself.  Make sure that the posts are accurate, complete and are properly worded. Look at the posts in this section (going back a few months) to get a correct perspective and format... Also, click on the posted links and follow the news all around the world...
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(From CNN)

Longest and highest glass-bottom bridge in the world...




Travelers will soon be able to walk across the world's longest and highest glass-bottom bridge, which spans two cliffs in China's Hunan province.
This week, workers were photographed installing the bridge's first piece of glass. Set against dramatic landscapes in Zhangjiajie National Forest Park, the bridge is 430 meters long, six meters wide and hovers over a 300-meter vertical drop. Construction on the bridge was originally expected to be finished at the end of 2015. It's now set to open in May this year.

World's highest catwalk?

Designed by Israeli architect Haim Dotan, the glass-bottom bridge will also feature the world's highest bungee jump and serve as a runway for fashion shows. Hanging above Zhangjiajie Grand Canyon, it will be able to hold up to 800 people at once. Digital renderings of the bridge highlight the architectural firm's vision -- to build a glass structure that fades into the clouds.

Stunning as the view is, tourists will likely tread carefully. In October last year, cracks appeared in a mountainside glass walkway in Yuntaishan Scenic Park, in China's central Henan province, just two weeks after opening. The incident sent visitors running and screaming in panic, according to witnesses. Park officials said the damage was superficial and posed no threat to safety.
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(From CNN)

Lost city revealed in jungles of Honduras

Artifacts from the lost White City of Monkey God, Honduras (on display in Catacamas, Honduras)

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Move over T. rex, new dinosaur unveiled


Titanosaur may be world's largest dinosaur 

(CNN) If you thought the dinosaurs in "Jurassic Park" were big, wait until you see the newly discovered 122-foot-long dinosaur that is displayed at the American Museum of Natural History. 
This dino surpasses the museum's model of a blue whale by about 30 feet. The prehistoric creature is so big it cannot even fit in the gallery space. Part of its 39-foot-long neck will extend through the passageway to greet visitors.
The mysterious dinosaur was discovered in the Patagonian desert region of Argentina in 2014. A team from the Museo Paleontologico Egidio Feruglio in Argentina led by José Luis Carballido and Diego Pol spent over 18 months excavating the site, where they unearthed the new species.
"This animal is so new it doesn't even have an official species name yet," said Mark Norell, chairman and Macaulay Curator at the natural history museum. Based on the dinosaur's characteristics it was placed in the titanosaur group. This group of dinosaurs is known for its giant lizard-like appearance. They have long necks and whip-like tails, small heads, and walk on four thick legs.  At the discovery site, scientist unearthed 223 fossil bones belonging to six individuals of this new species. Scientist calculate that these giant herbivores weighed around 70 tons, which is about 10 African elephants. 
The fossils reveal the creatures were all young adults and roamed the lush forest of Patagonia around 100 million years ago. 
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(Tampa, Florida - January 9, 2016)
Sunset, pier, palm tree and a water spout

Post facts about Tornados and water spouts!
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(From BBC)

World's largest blue star sapphire 'found in Sri Lanka'


The blue star sapphire has been nicknamed The Star of Adam

Gemologists in Sri Lanka claim that the largest blue star sapphire yet has been discovered in a mine in the country.The gemology institute in the capital Colombo has certified that the gem weighs 1404.49 carats and say they have not certified anything larger.
The gem is valued at at least $100m and the current owner estimates that it could sell for up to $175m at auction. Sri Lanka's gem industry, for which sapphire is the main export, is worth at least £70m ($103m) annually.
Blue star sapphires are so named because of the distinctive mark found at their centre. The new gem was mined in the city of Ratnapura, in southern Sri Lanka, which is known as the City of Gems.





It has been named the The Star of Adam by its current owner, after a Muslim belief that Adam arrived in Sri Lanka after being sent away from the Garden of Eden. It is claimed he then lived on the slopes of a mountain now known as Adam's Peak.
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(From CNN) 

Plans for underwater 'oceanscraper' revealed

http://www.cnn.com/2016/01/01/architecture/vincent-callebaut-underwater-skyscraper/index.html

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Sunday, December 6, 2015

2015 Nat Geo Prep - Week 6 - EUROPE

December 6 to 12

Learn the following:
Countries, capitals, regions, provinces and states, major cities and towns, geographic sobriquets, bordering countries and boundaries, mountains, rivers (origin, flow, mouth and towns and cities near them), tourist attractions, country flags and symbols, flora and fauna, national parks, natural resources, major industries, major exports and agricultural products, minerals and mines, islands, straits, archipelagos, isthmii, oceans and seas, gulfs and bays, ocean currents, deserts, volcanoes, currencies, religions, languages, major ethnic groups and native populations, natural hazards and current events. Label a blank map of the continent with each country's name and its mountains, rivers and tourist attractions. Note the relative location of each country, its neighbors and associated geographical features.






Useful links:
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Tuesday, December 1, 2015

GeoBee Fact File - December, 2015

Read the posted information to expand your body of knowledge and make a note of facts that are not familiar to you.  Post all the NEW facts (as you learn them) in this section in a statement or in a Q/A format.  This is also the location for you to post information in the ongoing Fact File assignment (seniors, at least 10 NEW facts that your learned, 3 times a week; juniors, at least 10 NEW facts, twice a week).
Ensure that all posts are accurate, clear and relevant!!!
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(From CNN)
Weird water features...

Lake Hillier, Middle Island, Western Australia
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By Anisha Shah, for CNN

Where to go in 2016: Top 16 up-and-coming destinations


Mandrill in Gabon

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http://www.history.com/news/7-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-nobel-prizes

Mahatma Gandhi never won the Nobel Peace Prize...





Beginning in 1937, Indian leader Mohandas Gandhi was nominated for the award five times. His final nomination came just weeks after his assassination in January 1948. At that point in its history, the Nobel Committee had never awarded a prize posthumously, though its original governing charter did allow for this in extenuating circumstances. However, the committee determined that Gandhi had left behind no suitable heirs or organizations able to accept the award or its prize money. Unwilling to bestow the award posthumously, yet recognizing Gandhi’s lifelong commitment to non-violence, they instead decided not to award that year’s peace prize to anyone, stating that there were no “suitable living candidates” worthy of the award. 


The Gandhi controversy endures: In 1961, Dag Hammarskjöld, Secretary-General of the United Nations, was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize, even though he had died in a plane crash earlier that year. When the Dalai Lama was awarded the peace prize in 1989, he announced that he was accepting the award, in part, as a tribute to Gandhi. 

And, in 2006, more than 50 years after Gandhi’s death, the Nobel Committee itself publicly acknowledged the omission, expressing regret that Gandhi had never been awarded the prize.
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Rare meeting place of a sea and a desert



In La Guajira, desert dunes tumble straight down into the Caribbean.
This is the land of the Wayuu people, indigenous South Americans who eke out an existence in this harsh environment by herding, weaving and generally hanging on by any means they can.
Barely more than a hundred miles from the world's highest coastal mountain range, where glaciers cap 18,000-foot peaks just 25 miles from the sea, the La Guajira Desert receives just a handful of days of rain each year. But the blazing sun accentuates stark contrasts of orange sand against turquoise sea. And clear night skies offer stargazers glorious cosmic shows from their beach-side hammocks.
La Guajira's only vacation spot per se is the kite surfing mecca of Cabo de la Vela.
Just a couple of tour companies with strong ties to the Wayuu currently make the long journey to bleak Punta Gallinas and the neighboring Taroa Dunes, more than half a day's drive to the north.
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The ten hottest places in the world

http://www.cntraveler.com/galleries/2015-11-27/the-hottest-places-in-the-world



GeoBee News of the Day - December, 2015

As you follow important events around the world, make a note of them from the competition perspective and post the facts here in a statement or in a Q&A format.
Emphasize the geographical aspects of the place more than the main news/event itself.
Make sure that the posts are accurate, complete and are properly worded. Look at the posts in this section (going back a few months) to get a correct perspective and format... Also, click on the posted links and follow the news all around the world...
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Picture of the day...
Superb view of Kanchanjunga from Darjeeling, West Bengal

By Mahua/GeoBee parent

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(From CNN)

Best country in the world to live? Still Norway, according to the U.N. 

Trolltunga, Norway
(CNN)When it comes to health and prosperity, there's no topping Norway
For the 12th year in a row, the land of lefse and lutefisk has earned the number one spot on the United Nations' 2015 Human Development Index (HDI), released as part of its annual Human Development Report. 
    The HDI measures countries in three basic areas -- life expectancy, education and income/standard of living. 
    Norway earned high marks in all areas to get an overall score of 0.944. Its life expectancy at birth is 81.6 years, while its gross national income (GNI) per capita is $64,992. 
    Rounding out the top five are: Australia (0.935), Switzerland (0.930), Denmark (0.923) and the Netherlands (0.922). 

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    What is climate change?

    The planet's climate has constantly been changing over geological time. The global average temperature today is about 15C, though geological evidence suggests it has been much higher and lower in the past.
    However, the current period of warming is occurring more rapidly than many past events. Scientists are concerned that the natural fluctuation, or variability, is being overtaken by a rapid human-induced warming that has serious implications for the stability of the planet's climate.

    What is the "greenhouse effect"?   

    The greenhouse effect refers to the way the Earth's atmosphere traps some of the energy from the Sun. Solar energy radiating back out to space from the Earth's surface is absorbed by atmospheric greenhouse gases and re-emitted in all directions.

    The energy that radiates back down to the planet heats both the lower atmosphere and the surface. Without this effect, the Earth would be about 30C colder, making our planet hostile to life.



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    (From BBC)

    EU's Sentinel colour Earth camera now operational



    The extraordinary Okavango Delta in Botswana. Vegetation, in bright green, is fed by heavy rains from December to March. It is an oasis in what is otherwise an arid area. The Kalahari dunes to the left are picked out in a rose color.

    The Namibian city of Swakopmund is obscured by cloud. But the extensive dunes of the Namib Desert are cloud-free. Sentinel-2a will eventually operate alongside a second platform, increasing the opportunities to get clear views of the the ground.

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    (From BBC)

    Brazil links Zika fever to birth defects






    Aedes aegypti mosquitoes are carriers of the yellow fever, dengue, chikungunya viruses as well as Zika.
    The Brazilian health ministry has confirmed a link between a mosquito-borne virus from Africa, Zika Fever, and a high incidence of birth defects. The fever, it said, is behind a spike in cases of micro-encephalitis - an inflammation of the brain contracted in the first months of pregnancy. 
    The ministry said doctors had found Zika virus in the blood and tissue of a baby with micro-encephalitis in the north-eastern state of Ceara. It said it was also the first time in the world that adult deaths from Zika virus had been registered. Most cases have been in the north-east of Brazil but cases also rapidly appeared in the south-east, in Rio and Sao Paulo. 
    The virus was first detected in Brazil in April and has spread rapidly to 18 states. It appears relatively harmless at first, causing a rash and a fever for a few days.Zika is transmitted by the Aedes aegypti mosquito, also known to carry the yellow fever, dengue and chikungunya viruses.The ministry said Zika had become a serious risk to public health and that Brazil must embark on an emergency programme to control the Aedes aegypti mosquito to prevent the virus's spread.
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    Sunday, November 29, 2015

    2015 Nat Geo Prep - Week 5 - ASIA

    29 November to December 5, 2015

    Learn the following:
    Countries, capitals, regions, provinces and states, major cities and towns, geographic sobriquets, bordering countries and boundaries, mountains, rivers (origin, flow, mouth and towns and cities near them), tourist attractions, country flags and symbols, flora and fauna, national parks, natural resources, major industries, major exports and agricultural products, minerals and mines, islands, straits, archipelagos, isthmii, oceans and seas, gulfs and bays, ocean currents, deserts, volcanoes, currencies, religions, languages, major ethnic groups and native populations, natural hazards and current events. Label a blank map of the continent with each country's name and its mountains, rivers and tourist attractions. Note the relative location of each country, its neighbors and associated geographical features.


    Clickable map...   http://memographer.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/07/map-asia-004.jpg

    Clickable map...http://www.nationsonline.org/oneworld/asia_map.htm



    Useful Links: