Do you know?

Do you know? (Submitted by Karan Menon)

World (Questions) What is the largest lake in the Finger Lakes? What is the smallest country by area in both the Americas and in the Western Hemisphere and also the least populous country in the Americas as well? What is the largest lake in Honduras? What Panamanian city is the capital of the Chiriquí province, the largest city in western Panama, and a major trade port for goods coming from and going to Costa Rica? The Bay of Pigs invasion took place at the Bay of Pigs, an inlet of which large gulf of southern Cuba bordering the provinces of Matanzas and Cienfuegos? Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, lies on a gulf of the Caribbean Sea that also borders the cities of Saint-Marc, Miragoâne, and Jérémie. Name this gulf. What is the capital of Easter Island? The Gulf of Morrosquillo is part of which country? Which city near Catalina Island is the 3rd largest city in Dominican Republic after Santo Domingo and Santiago del Los Caballeros? Which Ecuadorian highland city located on the Tomebamba, Yanuncay, Tarqui, and Machangara Rivers is a UNESCO World Heritage Trust Site for its many historical buildings? Santa Cruz, the most populous city in Bolivia is on the banks of which river? What is the longest river in the world without a single dam on its catchment? What is the highest volcano in Asia? What is the highest volcano in North America? Which peak, the 2nd highest point in Papua New Guinea is the highest volcano in Oceania? What peninsula contains the European section of Turkey as well as parts of Bulgaria and Greece? Which mountain in the Executive Committee Range in Marie Byrd Land is the highest volcano in Antarctica and one of the 7 Volcanic Summits? The Wallace Line runs through which 2 Indonesian straits? Which strait separates Borneo and Palawan? What strait separates Borneo and the Sulu Archipelago? Which country is divided into parishes called Curacies, has no national debt, and is the only country in the world where there are more cars than people? Verona, the setting for Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, is located on the banks of the Adige River in which Italian Region? What is the term for the process of mountain formation by the folding of the earth’s crust? The Chinguetti Field is off the coast of which country? Which waterfall in Norway is the tallest waterfall in Europe? Which prefecture level city in Inner Mongolia is the largest city by area in the world, covering an area about ½ the size of France? What is the 2nd largest port of France, after Marseille, located on the estuary of the Seine River? (Answers) What is the largest lake in the Finger Lakes? (Seneca Lake) What is the smallest country by area in both North America and in the Western Hemisphere and also the least populous country in the Americas as well? (St Kitts and Nevis) What is the largest lake in Honduras? (Lake Yojoa) What Panamanian city is the capital of the Chiriquí province, the largest city in western Panama, and a major trade port for goods coming from and going to Costa Rica? (David) The Bay of Pigs invasion took place at the Bay of Pigs, an inlet of which large gulf of southern Cuba bordering the provinces of Matanzas and Cienfuegos? (Gulf of Cazones) Haiti's capital, Port-au-Prince, lies on a gulf of the Caribbean Sea that also borders the cities of Saint-Marc, Miragoâne, and Jérémie. Name this gulf. (Gulf of Gonave) What is the capital of Easter Island? (Hanga Roa) The Gulf of Morrosquillo is part of which country? (Colombia) Which city near Catalina Island is the 3rd largest city in Dominican Republic after Santo Domingo and Santiago del Los Caballeros? (La Romana) Which Ecuadorian highland city located on the Tomebamba, Yanuncay, Tarqui, and Machangara Rivers is a UNESCO World Heritage Trust Site for its many historical buildings? (Cuenca) Santa Cruz, the most populous city in Bolivia is on the banks of which river? (Pirai River) What is the longest river in the world with a single dam on its catchment? (Fly River) What is the highest volcano in Asia? (Mount Damavand) What is the highest volcano in North America? (Pico de Orizaba) Which peak, the 2nd highest point in Papua New Guinea is the highest volcano in Oceania? (Mount Giluwe) What peninsula contains the European section of Turkey as well as parts of Bulgaria and Greece? (Thrace) Which mountain in the Executive Committee Range in Marie Byrd Land is the highest volcano in Antarctica and one of the 7 Volcanic Summits? (Mount Sidley) The Wallace Line runs through which 2 Indonesian straits? (Makassar and Lombok Straits) Which strait separates Borneo and Palawan? (Balabac Strait) What strait separates Borneo and the Sulu Archipelago? (Sibutu Passage) Which country is divided into parishes called Curacies, has no national debt, and is the only country in the world where there are more cars than people? (San Marino) Verona, the setting for Shakespeare’s play Romeo and Juliet, is located on the banks of the Adige River in which Italian Region? (Veneto) What is the term for the process of mountain formation by the folding of the earth’s crust? (Orogeny) The Chinguetti Field is off the coast of which country? (Mauritania) Which waterfall in Norway is the tallest waterfall in Europe? (Vinufossen) Which prefecture level city in Inner Mongolia is the largest city by area in the world, covering an area about ½ the size of France? (Hulunbuir) What is the 2nd largest port of France, after Marseille, located on the estuary of the Seine River? (Le Havre)

Why Geography Bee?

Why Geography Bee?

Preparing for this competition is a fun way of learning about places and people, all across the world! It increases geographic knowledge and helps children in becoming champions. It instills in them the universal principles of education – the desire to learn, the ability to focus, the discipline to stay on course, the importance of working hard, an opportunity to understand novel concepts and to make a sense of every day, world events .
Preparing for Geography Bee leads to learning important life lessons that are absolute pre-requisites for higher achievement.

Why Geography?

Why Geography?

In an increasingly interconnected, interdependent and compressed world, knowing about the world and the happenings around will enable us to understand how remote events have the ability to impact people's lives all around the world. Geography connects physical systems, cultural characteristics, evolution and modification of environments and availability and distribution of resources. Being Geographically literate and by having a mental map of the world, children will have a decent chance to become global citizens and consequently, primed to be active players on the world stage. They are also more likely to appreciate Mother Earth as the homeland of humankind, for making wise management decisions about how the planet's resources should be conserved and used in the next century.

Thursday, April 23, 2015

World's Happiest Countries

(From CNN - http://www.cnn.com/2015/04/23/travel/feat-world-happiest-countries-2015/index.html)

Lake Wanaka, Near Queenstown, South Island, NZ




Here are the top 10 happiest places on Earth, according to the World Happiness Report. 
1. Switzerland
Switzerland took the top spot from Denmark in 2015, rising from third to first place in this year's list of the world's happiest countries. 
Bern, the capital city of Switzerland, has the cobblestone streets and medieval architecture that make it apparent why the old city is a UNESCO World Heritage Site. Since the city's founding in the 12th century, it has expanded in an often neat and orderly fashion. And the lovely River Aare offers in-town swimming and boating. 
Looking to get out of the capital city? Book a trip to Lucerne, where you can take a boat trip on the lake, ride the panorama gondola, take in the views on the new Dragon Ride aerial cableway and ride on the world's steepest cog railway. Book the Golden Round trip and get all four trips -- and stunning views of the Alps -- in one day. (The railway reopens in mid-May.) 
And no matter where you go, there will certainly be plenty of delicious chocolate to try. 
2. Iceland
Nature and culture combine to make Iceland a truly happy place, so delightful that the tiny country jumped from ninth to second place this year. 
Explore South Iceland, where many of the ancient tales -- called sagas -- that document Iceland's 10th- and 11th-century history are remembered. A two-hour drive from the capital city of Reykjavik, south Iceland is home to Vatnajokull Glacier, the 60-meter (197-foot) Skogafoss Waterfall and amazing fresh seafood. (Though you could probably skip the fermented shark ...) 
No matter where you visit, there's probably a geothermal swimming pool or hot spring spa to soak your weary bones after a long day of exploring. And when you get back to the capital, note that the renowned annual Reykjavik Art Festival will take place from May 17 through June 7. 
3. Denmark
Never mind that Denmark lost the top spot this year and is now the third-happiest country in the world. 
Looking at all that Danes have to be happy about, you won't notice the slight dip while you're enjoying jazz at the Copenhagen Jazz Festival in July, hanging out with the hipsters at Queen Louise's Bridge, taking a canal tour or playing beach volleyball in front of the Royal Danish Playhouse. 
Prefer your music in the woods? Head to Smuk Fest ("The Beautiful Festival"), a rock/pop festival in the woods of Skanderborg held in August. 
Wherever you go, enjoy that Danish tradition of "hygge," sometimes translated too simply as the need for "coziness." It's really a complex sense of intimacy, community and contentment that generally happens with friends and family, and it makes for one happy country. 
4. Norway 
The sun never sets in some parts of Norway during the summer months, and the North Cape area is one of the best spots to play when the sun stays out for 24 hours. Visitors love to golf, hike and even run a marathon during the months ruled by the midnight sun. 
If your taste buds dictate your travels, head to the Norwegian capital city of Oslo, a gastronomic paradise where the Michelin food guide has awarded five stars among four restaurants: Ylajali, Statholdergaarden and Fauna (one star each) and Maeemo (two stars). 
5. Canada
Canada combines European style, sensibility and history with the enormous natural wonder of North America. 
Within the French-speaking province of Quebec, a tour through the historic city of Old Quebec is a treat for any Francophile. Founded in the early 17th century, it's the only North American city north of Mexico that still has its fortifications. The historic district is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Just a few minutes from downtown Quebec City, Ile d'Orleans is a small island where farming and agriculture are still a way of life. And if nature is what you crave, in less an hour from Québec City, you could be hiking through the Parc national de la Jacques-Cartier, home to the glacial Vallée de la Jacques-Cartier.
6. Finland
What a happy event to spot the rare Saimaa ringed seal, which adapted to freshwater living after the Ice Age cut off its lake home from the sea. There are only about 300 of them in the world, and they can be found at Lake Saimaa in eastern Finland. 
But you might have more luck spotting the white whooper swan, Finland's national bird, whose arrival heralds the start of spring.
For a more urban experience, visit Helsinki's Market Square and Museum of Contemporary Art Kiasma. And you can still spot animals in the capital city: In mid-May, the cows will be herded into the fields in Viikki, a neighborhood in Helsinki, after the long winter. Locals always gather to celebrate this moo-ving event. 
7. Netherlands (Holland)
Though the Netherlands' tulips are without equal, and they are most stunning at Keukenhof (known as the Garden of Europe), there are so many beautiful spots across the country to walk and bike to welcome spring and its trademark flower. 
For a more regal celebration, note that the kingdom celebrates its 200th year this year with many festivities. 
8. Sweden
In a country that's very fond of celebration, Swedes love to celebrate midsummer, the longest day of the year, most of all. It's a national holiday marked with traditional food and dances around a maypole. 
Can't make the midsummer parties? There's still plenty to do. Just 20 minutes from the capital city of Stockholm, the Stockholm Archipelago of about 30,000 islands offers endless opportunities for contentment. Swimming, hiking, cycling, fishing, horseback riding -- it's all within your reach by booking a boat ride. (Some boat trips include meals and tours of many of the islands.)
9. New Zealand
New to the top 10 list of happiest countries, New Zealand has plenty of reasons to celebrate. Though it's always been an attractive spot to explore, Peter Jackson choosing the country to host the filming of the "Lord of the Rings" movie trilogy has given New Zealand more attention than money could buy. 
The capital city of Wellington has benefited from the growth of the movie industry, developing a happening restaurant and design scene. 
And many of the country's natural wonders have gained international attention, including the 2,291-meter (7,516-foot)-high Mount Ngauruhoe, which played the fictional Mount Doom. It's part of Tongariro National Park, a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
10. Australia
The Great Barrier Reef, the world's largest collection of coral reefs, is a natural phenomenon not to be missed. Australians are arguing fiercely over manmade threats to its existence (and no one is happy about that). 
Once you've had a chance to explore that magical underwater realm, head to the Australian state of Tasmania, an island 240 kilometers (149 miles) off the mainland coast. The Tasmanian Wilderness, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, includes one of the last surviving temperate rainforests in the world. 
To see the wilderness up close, try hiking the stunning 65-kilometer (40-mile) Overland Track. It takes about six days for hikers (who must book the trip in advance), but day-trippers can take short hikes starting at Cradle Mountain Visitor Centre and Dove Lake.

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Original names of Caribbean countries

(Source: Caribbean, West Indian, African-Americanor African by Dr. Arthur Lewin)




Before the arrival of Columbus, there were three groups of native peoples in the Caribbean: The Arawak, the Carib, and the Ciboney. The Arawak populated the larger Caribbean Islands of Cuba, Hispaniola, Jamaica, and Puerto Rico. The Carib lived on the smaller volcanic islands of the eastern Caribbean: St. Kitts-Nevis, Antigua, Guadeloupe, Dominica, Martinique, St. Lucia, Barbados, St. Vincent and Tobago. They had migrated earlier from the mainland of what we now call South America.

Both the Arawak and the Carib believed in the after life. The Arawaks called the spirits of the dead opias or hubias. They were said to wander about the bush after dark, passing their time feasting and dancing. The Arawaks of Haiti believed in Coaibai, the Kingdom of Death. Every leader of importance had his own Kingdom of Death, uninhabited places where spirits roamed.

The Carib and the Arawak peoples were largely annihilated by the Spaniards with a century of contact with them. Some committed suicide rather than live under the Spaniards. Others perished from disease and overwork as they the first people in the western hemisphere to be enslaved. Due to the need for labor, men and women were taken from Africa to work as slaves.


Name TodayOriginal NameName TodayOriginal Name
AntiguaWaladliMontserratAlliouagana
CubaCubanacanNevisOualie
DominicaWaitbuliPuerto RicoBorinquen
Dominican RepublicQuisqueyaSt. CroixAy-ay
GrenadaCamerhorneSt. KittsLiamuiga
GuadeloupeKaroukeraSt. LuciaHewanorra
HaitiHaitiSt. VincentHiroon
JamaicaXaymacaTrinidadKairi
MartiniqueMadinina

Thursday, April 2, 2015

2015 State Champions

Rishi Nair (5), Florida



Rohan Kanchana (6), Delaware



Karan Menon (8), New Jersey



Grace Rembert (7), Montana



Arnav Roy Patra (7), New York



Shriya Yarlagadda (6), Michigan


Wednesday, April 1, 2015

GeoBee Fact File - April, 2015

Read the posted information to expand your body of knowledge and make a note of facts that are not familiar to you.  Post those facts and others from different sources that are new to you in this section in a statement or a Q/A format.  Ensure that all posts are accurate and are properly worded.
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(From Atlas Obscura)

Temple of All Religions, Kazan, Russia


Located in the Russian city of Kazan, the colorful Temple of All Religions, or Universal Temple is mish-mash of architectural flourishes culled from most of the major world religions to create an uber-complex where all religions can come together in harmony. 
Established by philanthropist Ildar Khanov in 1992, the site is not actually a chapel in the traditional sense but is instead a center meant to stand as a symbol of religious unity. Khanov was an active proponent of rehabilitation services and, having overseen a few in his lifetime, built the center with the help of patients he met through his work. The exterior of the Temple looks almost like something out of a Disneyland Small World display, with a Greek Orthodox dome here and a Russian minaret there. There are influences culled from Jewish synagogues and Islamic mosques, and a number of spires and bells. All said the Temple incorporates architectural influences from 16 separate religions in a bright cacophony of devotion.
Khanov and his assistants lived at the site, working continually on the construction until Khanov's death in 2013. Today the Temple is still not freely open to the public but Khanov's associates still live on site and continue his work on the center.      
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GeoBee News of the Day - April, 2015

As you follow important events around the world, make a note of them from the competition perspective and post the facts here in a statement or in a Q&A format. Emphasize the geographical aspects of the place more than the main news/event itself. Make sure that the posts are accurate, complete and are properly worded.
Also, click on the posted links  and follow the  news all around the world!
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Massive Earthquake hits Nepal

(Saturday, April 25, 2015)

Kathmandu, Nepal (CNN)A 7.8 magnitude earthquake centered less than 50 miles from Kathmandu rocked Nepal with devastating force early Saturday, killing at least 806 people -- and probably more -- in Nepal's capital city, authorities said.
Afterwards, historic buildings in Kathmandu lay in rubble. The injured wound up being treated outside hospitals in chaotic scenes. Residents, terrorized by a seemingly endless series of aftershocks, huddled outdoors for safety.


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Calbuco Volcano erupts in Chile


(CNN)As ash from Chile's Calbuco Volcano spread east into Argentina, geologists warned of the potential for more activity Friday.
Evacuations in the region involved not only people but animals as well. 
"There is more seismic activity ... and we think there will be more activity today," Helmuth Huerta, a spokesman for Chile's National Geological and Mining Service, told CNN.
The volcano has already erupted twice this week, spewing ash to a depth of about 23½ inches (60 centimeters) in some places, according to the Ministry of Interior and Public Safety.
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(From CNN)

Nigeria's New President


Lagos, Nigeria (CNN)For the first time in Nigeria's history, the opposition has defeated the ruling party in democratic elections. 
Muhammadu Buhari has won Nigeria's presidential election, the country's Independent National Electoral Commission said. He defeated incumbent Goodluck Jonathan by about 2 million votes. 
The win comes after a long history of military rule, coups and botched attempts at democracy in Africa's most populous nation.
"A new day and a new Nigeria are upon us," Buhari said after his win Tuesday. "The victory is yours, and the glory is that of our nation." 
Buhari, 72, will be sworn in on May 29. He will take the helm at a critical time, as Nigeria grapples with the violent militant group Boko Haram, serious economic woes and corruption. 
Buhari is a Sunni Muslim from Nigeria's poorer North, while Jonathan comes from a Christian and animist South that is rich with oil. 
One of Buhari's biggest challenges will be Boko Haram, which has been terrorizing Nigeria as it tries to institute a strict version of Sharia law in the country. 

Sunday, March 1, 2015

GeoBee Fact File - March, 2015

Use this section to post NEW facts as you learn them.  These facts should be in a statement or Q/A format.  Ensure that all posts are precise, accurate and are properly worded.
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Blue Zones of the World

(From Wikipedia)


Blue Zones is a concept used to identify a demographic and/or geographic area of the world where people live measurably longer lives. The concept grew out of demographic work done by Gianni Pes and Michel Poulain, who identified Sardinia's Nuoro province as the region with the highest concentration of male centenarians. As the two men zeroed in on the cluster of villages with the highest longevity, they drew concentric blue circles on the map and began referring to the area inside the circle as the Blue Zone. Dan Buettner identifies longevity hotspots in Okinawa (Japan); Sardinia (Italy); Nicoya (Costa Rica); Icaria (Greece); and among the Seventh-day Adventists in Loma Linda, California, and offers an explanation, based on empirical data and first hand observations, as to why these populations live healthier and longer lives.
Zones      
The five regions identified and discussed by Buettner in the book The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who've Lived the Longest
  • SardiniaItaly (particularly Nuoro province and Ogliastra): one team of demographers found a hot spot of longevity in mountain villages where men reach the age of 100 years at an amazing rate.
  • The islands of OkinawaJapan: another team examined a group that is among the longest-lived on Earth[
  • Loma Linda, California: researchers studied a group of Seventh-day Adventists who rank among North America's longevity all-stars
  • Nicoya PeninsulaCosta Rica: the peninsula was the subject of research on a Quest Network expedition which began on January 29, 2007.
  • IcariaGreece: an April 2009 study on the island of Ikaria uncovered the location with the highest percentage of 90 year-olds on the planet - nearly 1 out of 3 people make it to their 90s. Furthermore, Ikarians "have about 20 percent lower rates of cancer, 50 percent lower rates of heart disease and almost no dementia".
Residents of the first three places produce a high rate of centenarians, suffer a fraction of the diseases that commonly kill people in other parts of the developed world, and enjoy more healthy years of life.
Characteristics  
The people inhabiting Blue Zones share common lifestyle characteristics that contribute to their longevity. The Venn diagram at the right highlights the following six shared characteristics among the people of Okinawa, Sardinia, and Loma Linda Blue Zones:
  • Family – put ahead of other concerns
  • Less smoking
  • Semi-vegetarianism – except for the Sardinian diet, the majority of food consumed is derived from plants
  • Constant moderate physical activity – an inseparable part of life
  • Social engagement – people of all ages are socially active and integrated into their communities
  • Legumes – commonly consumed
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(From Atlas Obscura)

SOUTHPORT, NORTH CAROLINA

FRYING PAN TOWER

This abandoned lighthouse looks like a rusting oil rig but is actually an adventurous bed and breakfast





Built to replace a permanently-manned "lightship" on the edge of the treacherous "Graveyard of the Atlantic," Frying Pan Tower was a unique lighthouse that was built like an oil rig before being left to rust in the middle of the ocean. However today it operates as a boutique rooming destination for people on adventurous holiday.
Completed in the 1960s, the light station was installed 32 miles off the coast of North Carolina using a four-legged base that once belonged to an oil drilling platform. The station replaced a boat that had been stationed in the spot for over a hundred years, warning ships of the dangerous shoals hidden just a few dozen feet beneath the surface. The new tower was built with two floors, a broad surface helipad, and the actual light tower on top. Originally manned by full crews of Coast Guard operators, the station was eventually fully automated, before becoming fully obsolete and being abandoned in 2004.
Once the rusting platform was left to be devoured by the sea, a number of plans for its future were put forth ranging from demolishing the structure to create an artificial reef to giving it over to a diving company, but in the end it was purchased by an independent buyer who did the unexpected. As opposed to attempting to destroy the unique rig, the new owner, with the help of volunteers set to restoring the tower as a one-of-a-kind sea stop.
Since being purchased in 2010, the tower has been significantly refurbished and inspected and today it operates as a sort of water-locked bed and breakfast for fishing weekends and such. The tower is far from a bucolic New England townhouse, but what it lacks in warm atmosphere it makes up for in rusty oceanic solitude.      
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(From)   http://www.antarcticguide.com/about-antarctica/antarctic-geography/

What is the difference between the poles?

South Pole vs North Pole
The earth is not a perfectly round ball – it is slightly flattened at the poles. The radius of the earth at the equator is 6378 km but to the poles is 6357 km. While they share this and many other common points, there are great differences between the two ends of the earth.
 Antarctic
Continent surrounded by ocean. South Pole: 283 m. (9,300 ft.) above sea level; bedrock 30 m. (100 ft.) above sea level. A narrow, deep continental shelf and restricted ice-free frozen ground. No tree line and no tundra. No native population
Nearly all (97.6 per cent) land is covered in South Polar ice sheet. Icebergs from glaciers and shelf ice, measured in cubic kilometres. Sea ice is mainly annual, salty, and less than two metres thick.
South Pole mean annual temperature = -58°F.
No terrestrial mammals. Marine mammals are whales and seals. Only 19 bird species between 70°-80° latitude and only lichens at 82° latitude.

 Arctic
Ocean surrounded by continents. North Pole: 1 m. (3 ft). of sea ice; bedrock 427 m. (1,400 ft.) below sea level. Shallow extensive continental shelf and extensive frozen ground. Extensive tree line and well defined tundra. Circumpolar native populations.
Limited land ice (largest is Greenland ice sheet). Icebergs from glaciers, measured in cubic metres. Sea ice is mainly multi-year, has low salinity, and is more than two metres thick.
North Pole mean annual temperature = 0°F
Several terrestrial mammals including reindeer wolf musk ox, hare, lemming, fox. Marine mammals are whales, seals, and polar bears. Some 107 bird species between 75°-80° latitude and 90 species of flowering plants at 82° latitude.

GeoBee News of the Day - March, 2015

As you follow important events around the world, make a note of them from the competition perspective and post the facts here in a statement or in a Q&A format. Emphasize the geographical aspects of the place more than the main news/event itself. Make sure that the posts are accurate, complete and are properly worded.
Also, click on the posted links  and follow the  news all around the world!
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(From CNN)

Tropical Cyclone Pam hits Vanuatu




Tropical Cyclone Pam, one of the strongest storms seen in the South Pacific in years, has made a direct hit on the capital of Vanuatu, Port Vila, raising fears of mass devastation.
Satellite imagery shows the eye of the massive Category 5 storm making landfall on the small island housing the city in central Vanuatu. 
The capital, the biggest city in the Vanuatu island chain, sits on the coastline, which is vulnerable to storm surges during powerful cyclones. Tropical Cyclone Pam is the strongest storm to make landfall since the devastating Super Typhoon Haiyan hit the Philippines in 2013.
Pam currently has sustained winds of 165 mph (270 kilometers per hour) with gusts of up to 200 mph (325 kilometers per hour), triggering concerns of torrential rainfall, flooding and landslides. 
It said the storm was now positioned about 47 miles (75 kilometers) east-southeast of Port Vila and has been moving southward. It's still about 43 miles (70 kilometers) north of Erromango, the next island in the chain.

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(From CNN)
Eruption of Shiveluch Volcano, Kamchatka, Russia


(CNN)A volcano in Russia led to the cancellation of flights in Alaska over the weekend.
Ash from Russia's Shiveluch volcano was the culprit behind the flight disruptions Saturday, said Jeff Freymueller, a scientist at the Alaska Volcano Observatory. 
The volcano erupted Friday, shooting ash into the atmosphere some 30,000 feet. Winds blew the ash cloud across the Bering Sea and into western Alaska, Freymueller said. 
Shiveluch, which has been erupting consistently, caused a similar incident in January, he said. 
Three volcanoes are erupting on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula: Shiveluch, Klyuchevskoy and Karymsky.
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