Do you know?

(Submitted by Saket Pochiraju) 1. Who were the first known group to develop a system of law and government? 2. Who was the last great Mughal ruler? 3. After Rome collapsed, which modern day city became the center of the western civilization for the next 1,000 years and was the capital of the Byzantine Empire? 4. Egyptian writing is called what term that is Greek for "Holy Writing"? 5. Gilgamesh is an epic poem of which developed civilization of Southern Mesopotamia that had their written language as Cuneiform? 6. Which empire was ruled by Achaemenid family until destroyed by Alexander the Great? 7. The Aegean volcano of Thera erupted disastrously in 1500 BC, destroying the Minoan Civilization in what island? 8. Who was the Aztec leader when Hernan Cortes arrived in Mexico? 9. Which war began when Russia destroyed the Turkish fleet and Britain had tensions about a Russian expansion to the Black Sea? 10. Denmark attempted to annex the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein from what former empire? 11. Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in this Balkan city which led to World War 1. Name this city. 12. After this president died, Adolf Hitler crowned himself ruler of Germany and a depression hit Germany. Name this president. 13. Because Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin made a pact; the U.S.S.R did not protect this country when it got invaded by the Nazis during World War 2. Name this country. 14. There are Moai statues on which island owned by Chile that had people move to it from the Marquesas Islands in AD 400? 15. Who was the last Macedonian Queen of Egypt, who was married to Julius Caser until he was assassinated? 16. The Romans called all people living outside of their empire what, thinking they were uncivilized? 17. Which family dominated Japan for 5 centuries from the 7th century AD? 18. What major Russian city is named after the great tsar, Peter the Great? 19. The Holocaust was genocide of what racial group in Europe? 20. Who was the courageous British prime minster during World War 2, who withstood the Nazi threat? 21. Which ruler of the Khmer Empire built the Angkor Wat in Cambodia? 22. The Aryans came to India from which place? 23. Every spring, Babylon is in danger of flooding caused by which two rivers? 24. The US constitution was wrote in what city? 25. Name the official sport of New Zealand? (Answers) 1. Who were the first known group to develop a system of law and government? (Sumerians) 2. Who was the last great Mughal ruler? (Aurangzeb) 3. After Rome collapsed, which modern day city became the center of the western civilization for the next 1,000 years and was the capital of the Byzantine Empire? (Istanbul) 4. Egyptian writing is called what term that is Greek for "Holy Writing"? (Hieroglyphs) 5. Gilgamesh is an epic poem of which developed civilization of Southern Mesopotamia that had their written language as Cuneiform? (Sumerians) 6. Which empire was ruled by Achaemenid family until destroyed by Alexander the Great? (Persian Empire) 7. The Aegean volcano of Thera erupted disastrously in 1500 BC, destroying the Minoan Civilization in what island? (Crete) 8. Who was the Aztec leader when Hernan Cortes arrived in Mexico? (Moctezuma) 9. Which war began when Russia destroyed the Turkish fleet and Britain had tensions about a Russian expansion to the Black Sea? (Crimean War) 10. Denmark attempted to annex the duchies of Schleswig and Holstein from what former empire? (Prussia) 11. Archduke Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in this Balkan city which led to World War 1. Name this city. (Sarajevo) 12. After this president died, Adolf Hitler crowned himself ruler of Germany and a depression hit Germany. Name this president. (Hindenburg) 13. Because Adolf Hitler and Joseph Stalin made a pact; the U.S.S.R did not protect this country when it got invaded by the Nazis during World War 2. Name this country. (Poland) 14. There are Moai statues on which island owned by Chile that had people move to it from the Marquesas Islands in AD 400? (Easter Island) 15. Who was the last Macedonian Queen of Egypt, who was married to Julius Caser until he was assassinated? (Cleopatra) 16. The Romans called all people living outside of their empire, and thinking they were uncivilized? (Barbarians) 17. Which family dominated Japan for 5 centuries from the 7th century AD? (Fujiwara Family) 18. What major Russian city is named after the great tsar, Peter the Great? (St. Petersburg) 19. The Holocaust was genocide of what racial group in Europe? (Jews) 20. Who was the courageous British prime minster during WW2, who withstand the Nazi threat? (Winston Churchill) 21. Which ruler of the Khmer Empire built the Angkor Wat in Cambodia? (King Suryavarnam 2) 22. The Aryans came to India from which place? (Southern Russia) 23. Every spring, Babylon is in danger of flooding caused by which two rivers? (Euphrates and Tigris Rivers) 24. The US constitution was wrote in what city? (Philadelphia) 25. Name the official sport of New Zealand? (Rugby)

Sunday, April 20, 2014

GeoBee Photo Album - April 20, 2014

In this new feature, you will be treated to some fantastic pictures of places and things.  Have fun looking at them and learn some new, relevant facts of the place/region/country to add to your existing body of knowledge - Feel free to post these new facts at the bottom of this section...

                                                        1. Festival of Lights, Ghent,  Belgium



                             2. Statue of Lord Murugan at the entrance to Batu Caves, Malaysia


3. Underground church at Lalibela, Ethiopia

                                                 
                                                       4. Poco Encantado Cave, Brazil
 


                                                                5. Quebec, Canada

Tuesday, April 1, 2014

GeoBee Fact File - April, 2014



Looking for a good way to participate in Earth Day?
Try setting up an Earth Dinner. Start by planning a dinner with as many local, seasonal, and organic ingredients as possible. Then, get to know the story behind your food. Where did it come from? Who were the farmers? Finally, have a conversation about food, farming, and your connection to the food and the Earth.
Dear Friend,
Earth Day is just one week away! This year’s theme is Green Cities. To learn how you can get involved, visit our Green Cities page.
The Earth Day Events Keep Pouring in!
Every day, we’re in contact with hundreds of partners around the world as they plan for Earth Day. We continue to learn about new innovative and impactful events. We wanted to share this event in Chile with you—it’s one of our favorites!

On Earth Day, The International Preparatory School in Santiago, Chile will host a green cities contest. Students will be asked to design and plan their own sustainable city, taking into account water management, energy, transportation, buildings, and food production. What a great way to get kids excited about environmental issues!
Cities Lead the Way
As part of the Green Cities campaign, Earth Day Network is working closely with cities around the world to help them become more sustainable. Along the way we have come across some innovative green programs and policies that have inspired us.
Two of the spotlight green cities that we’re proud to work with are Jackson, Mississippi and Santa Fe, New Mexico.
Earth Day at Union Station in Washington DC
Are you going to be in the DC area on Earth Day? Join us for Earth Day at Union Station. We’ll have educational and interactive exhibits and activities for all ages. NASA will be there with their Earth Tent, top scientists and astronauts! Amtrak shows off their new energy efficient engines. The Weather Channel will be broadcasting live and much more!
Our friends at JASON will donate $1 to our Green Cities campaign for every new like on their Facebook page! Like their page today to help us build more sustainable cities.
- The Earth Day Network Team




Posted on September 19, 2013 by Editor
Maps.com blog
The Continental Divide is the line which defines the divergent directions that rainfall will flow after it lands on the North American continent. In the contiguous 48 states, water falling west of this line formed generally by the crest of the Rocky Mountains, heads for the Pacific, and water falling east of it will flow to the Gulf of Mexico as shown on the first graphic below. But it’s not as simple as that, especially if you consider the whole of North America. Since there are not just two, but three oceans to act as flow recipients, there have to be other lines of division besides the simple “Continental Divide”, which should more accurately be called the Great Divide.
Maps101 blog
As seen in the second map, the Northern (or Laurentian) Divide shows the Arctic/Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico split, and the Eastern Divide defines the Atlantic/Gulf of Mexico split. Another line, the St. Lawrence Seaway Divide further defines northeastern water flow. The Great Divide actually extends down beyond Mexico, through Central America, and then to the tip of South America along the Andes. It should be noted that these dividing lines do not lie exclusively on knife-edged mountain ridges. Indeed, some parts of these divides are so flat as to seem incapable of being a line of separation, but careful surveying shows that the local “high” point is as defined. Another interesting concept to ponder is the Triple Point, or the places where two divides intersect. One such spot is the appropriately named Triple Divide Peak in the Montana Rockies. Conceivably, the water molecules in a single fat raindrop hitting just the right spot on that peak could separate into thirds and flow separately to the Arctic, Pacific and the Gulf of Mexico.

               
                                   ------------
Sonic Geography...Tourism of Sounds of Nature
(CNN) -- Modern travel is an intensely visual experience.We feast our eyes on glossy guidebooks before bombarding Facebook and Instagram with our oh-so stylish shots of footprints on empty beaches, stunning sunsets and that weird thing we found in the pool.



But in our efforts to soak up the sights and stuff our hard drives with selfies, we may be neglecting another vital element of the travel experience -- sound.
That's the worry of Trevor Cox, a British acoustic engineer who, armed with a microphone and digital recorder, has spent several years earwigging his way around the planet in search of what he calls its "sonic wonders."
"We're used to going on our travels and looking out for beautiful vistas and wonderful architecture, but we tend not to think about the sound," says Cox, who was struck by the notion of exploring a wider world of sound while investigating echoes in, of all places, a London sewer.
"So then I began to think about where I would go if you wanted listen to the most remarkable sounds in the world and I was surprised to find there was relatively little information," he tells CNN. "That's when I thought I should gather it myself."
Cox has documented his adventures in audio in the newly published "The Sound Book" (released as "Sonic Wonderland" in the UK) -- a fascinating journey which, over several years, takes him from scorching desert sands to slimy subterranean chambers.
He also runs a website aimed at encouraging others to explore sonic wonders and engage in "sound tourism," and points out that since most travelers carry cell phones, they're already equipped with powerful recording devices.

"It's all about making yourself aware and thinking as you wander around about what you are going to catch -- but all you really need to do is listen."

It's about time to make some noise about sound tourism.

With the aid of Cox, we've compiled a list of the world's best sonic destinations.

Singing sands (California)

Where: Kelso Dunes in California's Mojave Desert
What: When in contact with sliding humans, peculiarities in the sand produce deep parping sounds resembling propeller aircraft or sousaphone accidents.
Cox says: "This one was always high on my bucket list. You need the right sort of dune with the right size sand grains. When you scoot down on your backside you get this weird droning."
                                               Hear the sands 

                                               
Bearded singing seals (Norway)
Where: Svalbard, a bleak Norwegian archipelago of ice-capped mountains and fierce polar bears way out in the Arctic Ocean
What: Mind-bending, sub-aquatic sci-fi effects produced by hairy-faced sea mammals to woo their mates -- a soundscape worryingly similar to the tinnitus hangover of a Motorhead gig.
Cox says: "They don't really sound like animals, they sound like UFOs coming in to land -- they make this extraordinary noise that lasts about a minute."

Hear the seals



Next best thing to hearing the quetzal bird itself.
Next best thing to hearing the quetzal bird itself.

Chirping Mayan pyramid (Mexico)
Where: Temple of Kukulcan, Chichen Itza, Yucatan, Mexico
What: Clap your hands in front of this 1,100-year-old structure and you'll hear an echo not unlike the sacred quetzal bird.
Only disturbing if you've seen the 2008 film "The Ruins," in which sound-mimicking vines devour feckless tourists atop a Mayan pyramid.
Cox says: In his book, Cox asks whether the echo was a Mayan design reflecting sophisticated acoustic knowledge: "Imagine an ancient Mayan priest presiding over a ceremony and, with great theatricality, summoning the sound of the quetzal bird by clapping his hands."
Gong rocks (Tanzania)
Where: Moru Kopjes, Serengeti National Nark, Tanzania -- and other sites across Africa
What: Not a prog rock group, but one of several eons-old boulders that produce mellow notes when whacked with smaller stones.
Tonally, their range can be a bit on the monotonous side, but the fact that it probably resonates back to the dawn of civilization helps raise neck hairs.
Cox says: "Among the earliest evidence we have of what our ancestors might have listened to is left over bits of musical instruments like these rock gongs."
                                              Hear the rocks

Whispering gallery (India)
Where: Gol Gumbaz mausoleum, in Bijapur, a town in southwestern India's Karnataka state
What: This majestic, rose-domed structure built in the 1600s features one of the best examples of a whispering gallery -- an elevated architectural echo chamber that seems to sample human voices and loop them repetitively in the style of a 1960s horror flick.
Cox says: In "The Sound Book," Cox writes: "With children enjoying yelling and listening as their voices repeat over and over again, the atmosphere is like a crowded day at the swimming pool."
Hugely entertaining.


Iceland\'s volcanic landscape -- source of unusual sounds and noxious fumes.
Iceland's volcanic landscape -- source of unusual sounds and noxious fumes.

Bubbling mud pots (Iceland)

Where: Hverir, Namafjall, northern Iceland

What: A sulfurous volcanic landscape where noxious gas belches forth from roiling cauldrons of primordial gunge with the fury of a waterfall.


Cox says: "Tumultuous pools of battleship-gray mud bubble at a low simmer," Cox writes in his book. "They seem almost alive; some belch like a thick, gloppy lentil soup while others rage and splatter like an unappetizing gruel on a fast boil."


Hear the mud pots


World's longest reverberations (Scotland)
Where: Inchindown oil storage complex/Glasgow's Hamilton mausoleum -- Scotland
What: Cox crawled down slippery pipes to access a vast, emptyWorld War II oil tank built into a Scottish hillside near the town of Invergordon to measure the reverberations within.
Using a starting gun (and a saxophone), he pegged them at a record-breaking 75 seconds.
Sadly, since Inchindown is rarely open to the public, sonic tourists will have to make do with a trip to the previous Guinness record holder, also in Scotland. The grand Hamilton Mausoleum, just outside Glasgow, clocks in at 15 seconds.
How many miles would you drive for 30 seconds of bad song?
How many miles would you drive for 30 seconds of bad song?

Musical road (California)
Where: Avenue G, Lancaster, California
What: A series of grooves gouged into the pavement renders a stretch of the westbound roadway into an instrument that plays the "William Tell Overture" -- also known as the "Lone Ranger" theme -- when vehicles drive over it.
The rhythm is recognizable, but the tune sounds like someone gargling with water in an adjacent room.
Cox says: "It is a very bad rendition of the 'William Tell Overture' -- but it makes you laugh. "Keep driving and you'll hit California's I-5 highway for a drive north for stellar scenery and, you never know, some amazing sounds.




=================================================================================
Use this section to post new facts as you learn them. These facts should ONLY be in Q/A format. Ensure that all posts are precise, accurate for content and are properly edited.