Do you know?

Do you know? (Submitted by Bharath Ram)

(Questions) 1. Which passage separates Hispaniola from Puerto Rico? 2. Which two major straits separate Denmark from Sweden? 3. Which strait connects the Ionian Sea and the Adriatic Sea? 4. Which country used Devil’s Island off the coast of South America as a penal colony? 5. The Mesabi Range, known for deposits of iron ore is located in which U.S. state? 6. Which U.S. state has more cattle than most states have people? 7. Which Indian river originates in the Dhebar Lake in the Aravalli Range and empties into the Gulf of Khambat? 8. Which U.S. state has the oldest continuously occupied European settlement in the country? 9. In which Asian country have two former prime ministers who happen to be brother and sister been forced out of office, causing the military to take over the government? 10. Which two U.S. states, both located in the central region of the country, also contain the country’s fastest growing populations? 11. The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall and one of the most treasured and distinctive buildings of which European city? 12. Which island, lying south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, is known for being an affluent summer colony? 13. Sagrada Família is a large Roman Catholic church and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in which European city? 14. The Agaléga, known for their coconut production, are two of the Outer Islands of which country located in the Indian Ocean? 15. Lake Urmia is a salt lake located between the East Azerbaijan and West Azerbaijan provinces of which Asian country bordering Turkey? 16. Tristan da Cunha (Tristan), a group of volcanic islands in the southern Atlantic Ocean, is the remotest inhabited archipelago in the world, lying 2,000 kilometers away from the nearest inhabited land, St. Helena. These islands are part of an overseas territory of which country? 17. Isla Salas y Gómez, a small uninhabited island in the Pacific Ocean, is the easternmost point in the Polynesian Triangle. This island belongs to which country? 18. What is the name of the wind that blows across eastern Asia that is hot and dry in summer and bitterly cold in winter? 19. The Otavalo people inhabit the Andes Mountains in which country that had part of the Inca civilization? 20. The Manzanares River, a tributary of the Jarama River, which in turn is a tributary of the Tagus River, passes through which European city? 21. Roskilde, located on the island of Zealand, was the former capital of which European country? 22. Fes is the third largest city and the former capital city of which North African country? 23. Mandalay is the second-largest city and the former capital of which Southeast Asian country? 24. Name the most populous city and former capital of the Philippines? 25. Which river starts in the Rila Mountains, flows through Bulgaria, and is the longest river entirely within the Balkan region? (Answers) 1. Which passage separates Hispaniola from Puerto Rico? (Mona Passage) 2. Which two major straits separate Denmark from Sweden? (Skagerrak and Kattegat) 3. Which strait connects the Ionian Sea and the Adriatic Sea? (Strait of Otranto) 4. Which country used Devil’s Island off the coast of South America as a penal colony? (France) 5. The Mesabi Range, known for deposits of iron ore is located in which U.S. state? (Minnesota) 6. Which U.S. state has more cattle than most states have people? (Texas) 7. Which Indian river originates in the Dhebar Lake in the Aravalli Range and empties into the Gulf of Khambat? (Sabarmati) 8. Which U.S. state has the oldest continuously occupied European settlement in the country? (Florida (St. Augustine)) 9. In which Asian country have two former prime ministers who happen to be brother and sister been forced out of office, causing the military to take over the government? (Thailand) 10. Which two U.S. states, both located in the central region of the country, also contain the country’s fastest growing populations? (North Dakota and Texas) 11. The Royal Albert Hall is a concert hall and one of the most treasured and distinctive buildings of which European city? (London) 12. Which island, lying south of Cape Cod, Massachusetts, is known for being an affluent summer colony? (Martha’s Vineyard) 13. Sagrada Família is a large Roman Catholic church and a UNESCO World Heritage Site in which European city? (Barcelona) 14. The Agaléga, known for their coconut production, are two of the Outer Islands of which country located in the Indian Ocean? (Mauritius) 15. Lake Urmia is a salt lake located between the East Azerbaijan and West Azerbaijan provinces of which Asian country bordering Turkey? (Iran) 16. Tristan da Cunha (Tristan), a group of volcanic islands in the southern Atlantic Ocean, is the remotest inhabited archipelago in the world, lying 2,000 kilometers away from the nearest inhabited land, St. Helena. These islands are part of an overseas territory of which country? (United Kingdom) 17. Isla Salas y Gómez, a small uninhabited island in the Pacific Ocean, is the easternmost point in the Polynesian Triangle. This island belongs to which country? (Chile) 18. What is the name of the wind that blows across eastern Asia that is hot and dry in summer and bitterly cold in winter? (Buran) 19. The Otavalo people inhabit the Andes Mountains in which country that had part of the Inca civilization? (Ecuador) 20. The Manzanares River, a tributary of the Jarama River, which in turn is a tributary of the Tagus River, passes through which European city? (Madrid) 21. Roskilde, located on the island of Zealand, was the former capital of which European country? (Denmark) 22. Fes is the third largest city and the former capital city of which North African country? (Morocco) 23. Mandalay is the second-largest city and the former capital of which Southeast Asian country? (Myanmar) 24. Name the most populous city and former capital of the Philippines? (Quezon City) 25. Which river starts in the Rila Mountains, flows through Bulgaria, and is the longest river entirely within the Balkan region? (Maritsa River)

Why Geography Bee?

Why Geography Bee?

Preparing for this competition is a fun way of learning about places and people, all across the world! It increases geographic knowledge and helps children in becoming champions. It instills in them the universal principles of education – the desire to learn, the ability to focus, the discipline to stay on course, the importance of working hard, an opportunity to understand novel concepts and to make a sense of every day, world events .
Preparing for Geography Bee leads to learning important life lessons that are absolute pre-requisites for higher achievement.

Why Geography?

Why Geography?

In an increasingly interconnected, interdependent and compressed world, knowing about the world and the happenings around will enable us to understand how remote events have the ability to impact people's lives all around the world. Geography connects physical systems, cultural characteristics, evolution and modification of environments and availability and distribution of resources. Being Geographically literate and by having a mental map of the world, children will have a decent chance to become global citizens and consequently, primed to be active players on the world stage. They are also more likely to appreciate Mother Earth as the homeland of humankind, for making wise management decisions about how the planet's resources should be conserved and used in the next century.

Tuesday, October 14, 2014

GeoBee Fact File - October, 2014 - Part TWO

Use this section to post NEW facts as you learn them.  These facts should be in a statement or in a Q/A format.  Ensure that all posts are precise, accurate for content and are properly edited.

Sunday, October 12, 2014

Get Ready for this Year's Competition...




What should you learn?
Here are some pointers.  Learn these facts so well that you should be able to answer related questions on a dime.  The more meticulous you are in your preparation, that much better off you would be in advancing in the competition.

USA
States, capitals, regions,  major cities and towns, nick names, mountains, rivers, tourist attractions, bordering states and boundaries, state symbols and mottoes, national parks, major industries and current events. Label a blank map of the country with state names, mountains, rivers and tourist attractions. Note the relative location of each state, its neighbors and associated geographical features.

WORLD
Countries, capitals, regions, provinces and states, major cities and towns, geographic sobriquets, bordering countries and boundaries, mountains, rivers (origin, flow and mouth), tourist attractions, country flags and symbols, flora and fauna, national parks, natural resources, major industries, major exports and agricultural products, minerals and mines, islands, straits, archipelagos, isthmii, oceans and seas, gulfs and bays, ocean currents, deserts, volcanoes, currencies, religions, languages, major ethnic groups and native populations, natural hazards and current events. Label a blank map of each continent with each country's name and its mountains, rivers and tourist attractions. Note the relative location of each country, its neighbors and associated geographical features.

This, by no means, is a complete list.  But, if you know many of the facts in these categories, you will have a good chance of finishing at the top!      
Best of Luck!

Tuesday, September 30, 2014

GeoBee Fact File - October, 2014 - Part ONE

Use this section to post new facts as you learn them. These facts should be in a statement or in a Q/A format. Ensure that all posts are precise, accurate for content and are properly edited.

GeoBee News of the Day - October, 2014

As you follow important events around the world, make a note of them from the competition perspective and post the facts here in a statement or in a Q&A format.
Emphasize the geographical aspects of the place more than the main news/event itself.
Make sure that the posts are accurate, complete and are properly worded.

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Centre clears change in names of Karnataka cities, Belgaum now Belagavi

New Delhi, Oct 17, 2014 (PTI)
Here are the new names approved by the Central Government - Bangalore is already known as Bengaluru.
Belgaum  now Belagavi
Mangalore now Mangaluru
Bellary now Ballari 
Bijapur now Vijapura
Chikmagalur changed to Chikkamagaluru
Gulbarga changed to Kalaburagi
Mysore changed to Mysure
Hospet changed to Hosapete
Shimoga changed to Shivamogga
Hubli changed to Hubballi
Tumkur changed to Tumakuru
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OSLO, Norway (AP) — Malala Yousafzai of Pakistan and Kailash Satyarthi of India were jointly awarded the Nobel Peace Prize on Friday for their work for children’s rights
Read more: 17-year-old child rights activist wins Nobel Peace Prize.






















Watch the announcement -
http://edition.cnn.com/video/data/2.0/video/bestoftv/2014/10/10/nobel-peace-prize-winner-earlystart.cnn.html


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Cat 5 Cyclone Hudhud Heading towards Andhra Pradesh and Odisha




























Thermo-dynamic picture of Bay of Bengal





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Shrinking Aral Sea...


































(From CNN)


The Aral Sea was once the world's fourth-largest lake. Now much of it is a vast toxic desert straddling the bordersof Kazakhstan and Uzbekistan, two former Soviet states in central Asia.
In recently released images, NASA's Earth Observatory shows the extent of the lake's recession over the past 14 years.
The damage reached its peak this year, when the eastern lobe of the South Aral Sea -- which actually was the center of the original lake -- dried up completely.
Until the 1960s, the Aral Sea was fed by two rivers, the Amu Darya and Syr Darya, which brought snowmelt from mountains to the southeast, and local rainfall. But in the 1960s the Soviet Union diverted water from the two rivers into canals to supply agriculture in the region.
With the loss of water, the lake began to recede and its salinity levels began to rise. Fertilizers and chemical runoff contaminated the lake bed. As the lakebed became exposed, winds blew the contaminated soil onto the surrounding croplands, meaning even more water was needed to make the land suitable for agriculture, according to an Earth Observatory release.
The falling water levels changed the local climate, too. Without the lake water to moderate temperatures, winters became colder and summers hotter, the Earth Observatory said.
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Welcome to BioMuseo in Panama...




(CNN) -- It stands at the entrance to the Panama Canal and took longer than the waterway to build, but a brightly colored biodiversity museum designed by architect Frank Gehry has finally celebrated its official opening
BioMuseo, a 4,000-square-meter exhibition space and botanical park, has been commissioned to highlight Panama's natural wonders and its role as a geological bridge between two continents.With its vivid appearance, BioMuseo has become a familiar sight to ships using the Canal's eastern gateway and to people using the nearby Bridge of Amerithat connects to an offshore archipelago.  Although its shape is reminiscent of Gehry's earlier works -- which include landmarks such as the Guggenheim Museum in Bilbao, Spain, and the Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles -- its bold color scheme is a departure.It's Gehry's first in Latin America, despite the fact his wife is Panamanian.


Visitors to BioMuseo will pass through a series of galleries incorporating interactive dioramas, including "Panamarama" -- a three-level, 12-screen projection space intended to create an immersive rainforest experience.Built on a former U.S. military base, the exhibition is described on the museum's website as "a combination of art and science that leads the visitor to experience a marvelous phenomenon."